Classically Inclined

October 20, 2014

New edition of Cloelia out now!

Filed under: Research — lizgloyn @ 2:08 pm
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You may remember that I have been acting as co-editor for the 2014 edition of Cloelia, the annual newsletter of the Women’s Classical Caucus. I’m delighted to announce that the 2014 edition is now out – click here for the official blog post and to download a PDF of the final product!

I have to say that I’m absolutely delighted with how the edition has turned out. There’s been a lot of behind-the-scenes work to get the volume into shape, and a lot of to-ing and fro-ing of documents between me and Alison, Cloelia‘s fearless editor, over the last few weeks to get it into this format, and it’s good to see the hard work pay off. More generally, I’m very proud of the collection of articles that the issue pulls together on a variety of topics concerning feminist pedagogy, particularly language pedagogy. There’s some great stuff in there, as well as some interesting insights from the survey we ran earlier in the year, and I hope that other teachers find the articles interesting and inspirational as well. It’s been great fun to pull together, and with any luck it will be of use and interest to many of its readers.

March 13, 2014

Cloelia and Feminist Language Pedagogy – A Survey

As some of you will have picked up on Twitter, I am acting as the guest editor for the forthcoming edition of Cloelia, the magazine of the Women’s Classical Caucus. Even though I’m not based in the US any more, I still have extremely warm feelings for the WCC as a place where intellectually like-minded scholars can come together and discuss both research and professional issues experienced by women in the academy. In fact, I’m starting to think that a project to start in the next couple of the years is setting up a UK equivalent of the WCC, not least because it would be great to have a UK equivalent of Feminism & Classics as a semi-regular feature in the conference schedule. That, however, is another story and quite a long way down the road, but expect me to keep on making murmurings about it until I have time to apply for the grant.

As I was saying, I’m acting as the guest editor for Cloelia, and the theme of this year’s magazine is pedagogy. Specifically, I’ve suggested that we focus on ancient language pedagogy – one of those areas that I’ve discovered from my teaching experience this year is perhaps rather less well covered than it might be. I thought Cloelia would be a great venue to pull together best practice, find out what’s going on in a range of departments, and hopefully get a sense of the ways in which the WCC and its members might support each other in this valuable enterprise.

This post is basically a rather long-winded invitation for those of you who are teaching the ancient languages in your day job, either at the university or the secondary level, to fill out the 2014 Cloelia survey on pedagogy. I’ve put it together with the permanent editor, Alison Jeppesen-Wigelsworth, as a way to collect information and experiences from those of us at the linguistic coalface; the results will be published in the 2014 edition of Cloelia, which will also be freely available on the web. We’ve already had some really interesting responses, but we’d like more! So if you are an ancient language teacher or you know ancient language teachers, please take a minute to fill in the survey or ask them to do so. We’d really appreciate your input, and it will help us get a better sense of what we as a profession are actually doing when it comes to this area of our teaching.

September 4, 2013

Reading Rape in Ovid’s Metamorphoses: A Test-Case Lesson

Some of you may remember that I wrote a post back in January last year about pedagogy research and reading rape in Ovid. I’m delighted to be able to share that the article I wrote about then has finally appeared in print – the PDF and the bibliographic reference are on Project Muse, and the journal is Classical World. You will need an institutional subscription to read through that link, but if this is of interest and you don’t have such a subscription, do get in touch.

This piece has taken its time to turn around – it was first given as a conference paper in January 2009, and since then has been working its way through the long process of peer review and journal scheduling that’s a bit inevitable in these things. However, I’m really pleased that it’s now appeared along with two of the other papers from that conference panel. Together, they make a well-proportioned suite of papers offering sensible resources for coping with teaching difficult topics.

A number of other workshops and publications around these themes (looking more broadly at difficult topics rather than specifically at rape) have now started to surface, and it’s getting some air in the pedagogic discussion in our field. I’m really pleased that this article is now out there and part of the conversation. There’s been a very positive reaction to it over Twitter and Facebook, including from people who have already had their copy of the journal in the mail, and I can only hope that everyone who reads it finds it practical and helpful.

May 16, 2011

Cloelia: Call for Submissions

Filed under: Research — lizgloyn @ 8:33 am
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The Women’s Classical Caucus is a wonderful thing, and I’ve had a great deal of pleasure from being involved with them, so I’m delighted to see the latest Call for Submissions from their newsletter, Cloelia. I repeat it below, for those who might not have seen it in the normal channels, and those who might not be aware of the WCC and the work that they do.  I’ve sent in a note about my thesis and my forthcoming article on Fortunata, so do drop the editor a line if you’ve got something suitable to share too.

Cloelia: Call for Submissions

“Cloelia: Women’s Classical Caucus Newsletter” is the official annual publication of the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC), which was founded to “foster feminist and gender-informed perspectives in the study and teaching of all aspects of ancient Mediterranean cultures and classical antiquity.” The WCC is an affiliate of the American Philological Association.

For the Fall 2011 Issue, we seek the following submissions (deadline:  August 15, 2011):

1. A List of Dissertations (completed or in progress, 2008-present) on topics related to the WCC mandate.

2. A List of Publications (2008-present/forthcoming) on topics related to the WCC mandate.

3. General Submissions as described below.

All submissions should be sent by email to the new editor, Dr. Alison Jeppesen-Wigelsworth (Cloelia.WCC@gmail.com).

General Submissions: All items should be submitted by email to the editor as .html, .doc, or .rtf attachments. We are always happy to receive articles, reports, news items, reviews, and announcements of interest to WCC members. Essays (700-800 words) describing issues or situations in which the WCC may become involved are welcome. Essays on more general or theoretical topics should be limited to 1200 words. Writers interested in contributing should contact the editor as soon as possible to inform her of their intentions. Readers who know of potential writers may suggest them to the editor who will contact the writer about the suggested topic. Announcements and calls (100-300 words) should include a title, all relevant dates, address and email of contact people, and a brief description.

May 12, 2011

[deadline now passed] Call For Papers: Feminism and Classics VI: Crossing Borders, Crossing Lines

Filed under: Research — lizgloyn @ 6:06 am
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I don’t normally do this sort of thing, but I wanted to share a call for papers for an excellent conference that’s taking place next year and that deserves a bit of publicity. I went to the last Feminism and Classics conference and delivered my paper on Fortunata there; thanks to the support and advice of the attendees, that paper is now an article in the process of publication, which just goes to show what happens if you pick your conferences well! I haven’t decided if I’m going to attend yet, not least because of the environmental costs associated with flying from the UK to Canada, but since I’m still on the fence I thought a little more publicity for the CFP wouldn’t hurt.

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CFP: Feminism and Classics VI: Crossing Borders, Crossing Lines
Brock University, St Catharines, Ontario, Canada
May 24-27, 2012

Ancient Mediterranean society was crisscrossed by multiple boundaries and borders. Firm boundaries between male and female, slave and free, gods and mortals (to name just a few) defined social identities and relationships, even as these lines were regularly crossed in religious ritual, social practices and artistic imagination. In current scholarship, Feminism is now Feminisms, encouraging multiple, and even transgressive, approaches to the study of women, gender, and sexuality in the ancient world. But has Feminism itself become a boundary, dividing fields of study or generations of scholars? Or is it a threshold, encouraging crossings between literary, historical and archaeological evidence? What new approaches are scholars using to push the boundaries of the evidence and the limits of our knowledge of the ancient world?

This conference will focus on boundaries, liminality, and transgression. What kinds of crossings did ancient people experience and what control did they have over such crossings? How did borders and border crossings differ in relation to gender, ethnicity, age, or legal status? If the masculine and feminine were clearly demarcated categories of being, how do we interpret homosexual, transvestite and gender-labile aspects of the ancient world? What points of contrast and connection exist between different types of gendered space (literal or metaphorical) and do they change when geographic or national boundaries are crossed? We invite submissions for abstracts of papers and workshops that explore these and related themes, and encourage proposals from a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives. Abstracts of 300 words can be submitted electronically to the conference website. Deadline for receipt of abstracts is June 30, 2011. For inquiries, please contact FCVI@brocku.ca.

The Department of Classics at Brock University is pleased to host Feminism and Classics VI. Brock University is the only Canadian University to be located in a UNESCO International Biosphere Reserve. It is within an hour’s drive of Toronto, Ontario and Buffalo, NY, and thus easily accessible and close to major attractions, shopping and airports. The Niagara region is framed by Lake Ontario, Lake Erie and the Niagara River, and is in the heart of Ontario’s vineyard country, and visitors can enjoy the culinary and wine trail. More information about Brock University and its location can be found at http://www.brocku.ca/about/why

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