Classically Inclined

May 23, 2016

New worlds, new projects, new monsters

Filed under: Research — lizgloyn @ 12:26 pm
Tags: , , ,

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a while but finding the opportunity and the words has been difficult. I’m coming through a bit of a perfect storm of conclusions – the end of being on a temporary contract, the end of working on the Seneca book manuscript, the end of teaching, the end (nearly) of exam term, the end of when I was supposed to be working at Royal Holloway. The thing about endings is that they bring beginnings with them – but these aren’t the sort of beginnings I’ve been used to. I’ve been thinking about this quite hard, because at first I assumed that my inability to think beyond the next short-term task was down to the small person – as I’ve said before, during maternity leave and the first few months back at work, I wasn’t up to anything more strenous than editing work. But there’s more to it than that.

In intellectual terms, the submission of the Seneca book (even if we still have to get through the foothills of indexing and copyediting) is a remarkably huge deal. At this point I have been working on it for eight years, in one form or another, from the original idea I suggested for my PhD and which got laughed out of court, to the germ of an idea about Seneca which I still vividly remember coming up with when walking down a summer road in Brooklyn, through the process of writing and defending the PhD, then the elongated and lengthy reiterations of editing, editing and editing some more to make the thing into a book… it’s been a long intellectual journey which has revolved around that material. To wave it off has been more of a jolt than I was expecting.

Moving onto a permanent contract marks a new phase too. I’ve spent every single year of my life up to this point thinking in terms of stages. Work to the GCSEs, to the A-levels, to the BA, to the PhD, to this short term contract, that one, and that one… there’s always been a fixed end-point around which I have structured my time and goals, particularly over the last five years. Suddenly, that’s gone. I am finding it quite difficult to adjust. (I know this is ‘my golden slippers pinch terribly’ territory, but bear with me.)

One of the immediate effects of my contract change is that I am eligible for a research sabbatical term next academic year – for those of you unfamiliar with this, the idea is that you take some time off teaching and administrative duties and focus solely on your research. In practice, all sorts of things tend to encroach on that time – but, thankfully, because nobody was planning for me to be at Royal Holloway next year, there is very little that has the potential to encroach, this year at least. So I can take the excellent advice that has been given to me by various people and think about consolidation.

What that means in practice is that I’ll be spending the summer and autumn working properly on to the next book project, which feels unbelievably daunting because the manuscript is due next year. I have to keep reminding myself that there are lots of different reasons that this book is different to the first, in terms of content and audience, and indeed the fact that I have got a lot better at writing than I was back at the start of the PhD. I’ve also been thinking about the ideas I want to explore in the new book for a while – ever since I wrote the Harryhausen piece – so I’m not starting entirely from scratch.

Yes, folks, this is finally the debut of the Monster Book. I had been planning to do this after the second Seneca book, but at the last Classical Association meeting I attended the opportunity came up to explore doing it at this stage, and I figured it would be a nice change of pace to do something reception-y that has been bouncing around in my head for a while. The book all stems from my vague dissatisfaction that there doesn’t seem to be a satisfactory way of explaining the appearance of classical monsters in popular culture. The book is meant to look at the ways that the ancient monster is reimagined in popular culture, and locates it in contemporary space. I may have to come up with a System, which is a bit unnerving, but I’m sure I’ll think of something. I’ve already made a start with the conference paper I’ve just given in Poland at the excellent Chasing Mythical Beasts conference – the paper for that is going to turn into a free-standing article but it’s all grist to the mill. I’m also giving a paper at the Celtic Classics Conference which I’m hoping will be one of the earlier chapters doing some of the theoretical heavy lifting.

There are so many issues to think through here. There’s the whole glorious world of monster theory to get stuck into, not to mention the fact that monsters have got all trendy in scholarship about ancient texts and I should probably get the hang of that. There’s a wealth of popular culture to get to grips with (which means a lot of bad things to read and watch, and hopefully some gems to discover in the middle of it all). But most of all, I have to get into the mindset of doing new, fresh research again, and start generating new words and ideas. At the moment, that feels like the hardest thing of all.

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4 Comments »

  1. Ooh, I am very excited to hear about this book. You are absolutely right that we don’t have a good way of thinking about classical monsters in C20/C21 pop-culture – I’d love to read a version of your Poland paper, by the way. It might be worth having a browse of the special issue of Transformative Works & Cultures I just edited, on classics and fan fiction – Amanda Potter, myself, and Tony Keen talk a bit about monsters. (All the other papers are great, just not about monsters.)

    http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/issue/view/23

    Comment by Ika — May 24, 2016 @ 1:26 am | Reply

    • Thanks, Ika! If you DM me a good e-mail address, I’ll send you the Poland paper in its current state – rough and undertheorised, but a place to start. The Transformative Works issue sounds great – I’ve got to start reading and thinking about my paper for the Celtic Classics Conference, which will hopefully be a bit more rigorous than the Poland one, so that looks like a good place to start.

      I know this is work that needs doing and I must admit to being a bit nervous about doing it, so we shall see how it all pans out!

      Comment by lizgloyn — May 29, 2016 @ 10:48 pm | Reply

  2. So looking forward to this. (and actually reading the papers currently circulating)
    All (academic) intellectual work of my own has ground to a halt due to needing to earn money & motherhood so really inspiring to read other stuff and see new projects take shape

    Comment by Byghan — May 25, 2016 @ 1:20 am | Reply

    • I feel you on the motherhood changing things front – major congratulations to you and yours on the safe arrival of your tiny, incidentally! Why I thought now would be the perfect time to do theoretical heavy lifting, I do not know, but we’ll see. It’s an idea I’ve been bouncing off for the last five years or so, but now I’m going to have to give it some proper serious thought.

      Comment by lizgloyn — May 29, 2016 @ 10:50 pm | Reply


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